Hinduism and the Bhagavada-Gita


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Hinduism and the Bhagavada-Gita

“The restlessness that you feel in this world and the unhappiness that characterizes your daily life will tell you that life in this world, as a human being is not complete. If human life is complete, you would be happy always and no problem would be facing you. There would be no anxiety of any kind if human life is the last point, the terminus.”

Using the supplied excerpt of the Bhagavad-Gita provided, consider the above quote while answering the following prompt. Your response should cite at least three examples from the text and demonstrate your knowledge Hinduism.

What, according to Krishna, is the proper mode of human action (karma)?  How is the relationship between action (karma) and duty (dharma) discussed in the poem?

Comments

  1. Duty (dharma) is action committed without thought or anticipation of a result but rather because it is what is supposed to be done. Duty is the action committed under the guidance of the eternal, or Brahman. Krishna said, on page thirteen: “So shall thy action be attended by no result, either good or bad; but through the spirit of renunciation thou shalt come to Me and be free,” by letting go of your choice of action and acting on duty it brings you close to Brahman.
    Karma is the affect on the person resulting from their action. Krishna said on page 12: “they who worship the Powers of Darkness, to such Powers shall they go; and so, too, those who worship Me shall come to Me.” This means that if you act upon ‘darkness’ then you will be brought to place of darkness, struggle, and pain. Likewise, if you act on duty you will be brought closer to Brahman.
    Krishna said on page 2: “When a man renounces even the thought of initiating action, when he is not interested in sense objects or any results which may flow from his acts, then in truth he understands spirituality.” This means that when a person ceases to act upon their desires and begins to act from duty they encounter a greater understanding of Brahman. Because of their karma they are closer to Brahman.

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    1. I like your explanation about dharma and karma, especially the explanation of karma from page 12 which is wrote about the our bad actions as the darkness. Also, in my opinion the last example that you use (from page 2) try to explain more how you can find the Brahman if you “disconnect” from the material world and if you conform yourself only with you need.

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    2. I like how you mention that dharma is done without thought or anticipation because if you do something because it will make you look like a good person you are doing it for selfish reasons and therefore it isn't dharma. True dharma is done without thought of reward or consequence. "renouncing every desire which imagination can conceive" (bg 3) even the desire for recognition.

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  2. For Krishna the proper mode of action, knowing as karma in the Hinduism is to life following a meditation way. That means to life trying to do a lot of things, but with balance, controlling it to don’t abuse of them.“ Meditation is not for him who eats too much, not for him who eats not at all; not for him who is overmuch addicted to sleep, not for him who is always awake.But for him who regulates his food and recreation, who is balanced in action, in sleep and in waking, it shall dispel all unhappiness. ”(Krishna, BG6).
    In the poem Krishna say that dharma and karma needs the other, because depends of actions we will go to the Brahman faster or slower. Also he say that all the universe is one with god(Brahman).(BG17). But to be one with Brahman we have to control our actions and duties with a lot of devotion. “Only by tireless devotion can I be seen and known; only thus can a man become one with Me, O Arjuna!”(BG23)

    Jaime de Benito Prieto

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    1. You say to be one with Brahman we have to control our actions and duties without a lot of devotion which I agree with. A truly spiritual being is spiritual without effort or realization, in other words they aren't actively trying to be spiritual. "a man so enlightened that he sees god everywhere is very difficult to find."(bg 7) an enlightened man does not have to look for Brahman he sees it everywhere.

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    2. I like that last sentence from the Bhagavada-Gita that you used to describe god and the spirituality. In it we can see a problem that is really common in people of different religions; they try to be spiritual and find god but they can’t find it because they try to find it far away and they didn’t search in the things around them, in the nature.

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  3. Dharma is seen as what if all was good and well with humanity would be done by mankind. Perfect and righteous actions are seen as dharma. Karma is your action. To become truly spiritual and for your Atman to advance further towards your Brahman your karma or actions must become pure actions or dharma.
    In the Bhagavad-Gita it is said that “But those who act righteously, in whom sin has been destroyed, who are free from the infatuation of the conflicting emotions, they worship Me with firm resolution.”(bg, 8) When someone’s actions are no longer selfishly motivated they advance further towards Brahman. They need to dispel their sinful and selfish desires and do their duty to be welcomed by Brahman.
    “He who leaves the body with mind unmoved and filled with devotion, by the power of his meditation gathering between his eyebrows his whole vital energy, attains the Supreme.”(bg, 9) Truly devoting oneself to dharma let’s them attain the supreme.
    “These bright and dark paths out of the world have always existed. Whoso takes the former, returns not; he who chooses the latter, returns.”(bg, 11) Selfish karma leads down the darker paths further and further away from Brahman while the bright path is dharma and leads towards Brahman.

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    1. I feel that your explanation of Dharma saing that is the perfection could have a lot of different meanings. But how you write with your example that is when your actions find a motivation farther than for yourself and trying to find something good for everyone.

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  4. Karma, according to Krishna, “He who experiences the unity of life sees his own Self in all beings, and all beings, and all beings in his own Self, and looks on everything with an impartial eye”(BG,4) This quote exemplifies the comfort and completion which one should find feeling tied to everyone and everything around us.

    Krishna describes the relationship between Karma and Dharma as: “He who acts because it is his duty, not thinking of consequences, is really spiritual and a true ascetic; and not he who merely observes rituals or ho shuns all action.” (BG, 1)

    According to Krishna “(...) experience acquired in his former life will revive, and with its help he will strive for perfection more eagerly than before.” (BG, 5) this mean It is ones duty to find their place of perfection and one must act upon that karma.

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  5. I like your example about the reaction between karma and Dharma; but maybe you should explain with your words the meaning of Krishna description, saying that follow Dharma (duty) people do good actions thinking in other people apart from themselves. And that makes there Karma better.

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  6. i would like to know your interpretation of “He who acts because it is his duty, not thinking of consequences, is really spiritual and a true ascetic; and not he who merely observes rituals or ho shuns all action.” (bg 1)

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    1. Probably she used that sentence from Krishna to say how people do good thinks, without thinking in the benefits that they might have for be good. And also that’s better than people how only follow the traditions of their religion with out understanding why they do that.

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