Buddhism: Renunciation of Self


Your initial post is due by February 27, 2019.

Final post are  due by March 5, 2019



  Buddhism: Renunciation of Self


Buddhism is a religion, philosophy and way of life that stresses the renunciation of self.  The Buddha sought to help lead others to the path to enlightenment by proclaiming the Four Noble Truths and the Eightfold Path as the basis to achieve Nirvana  Thus, Buddhist literature such as The Dhammapada constantly echoes these elements as a guide to becoming awakened.

For this blog, students will read the selection of The Dhammapada provided and using evidence from this sacred text discuss why and how “self” needs to conquered utilizing their knowledge of the Four Noble Truths and the Eightfold Path.

Students must use a minimum of three unique examples (do not repeat other's assertions) in their posts. Students that utilize evidence (citations from the reading) in their responses will be rewarded with a better evaluation. When citing, please, please let your fellow classmates know which chapter you are referencing (i.e. Old Age).

Comments

  1. To start, the Buddhism is a region which try to find a easy “way” to go to Nirvana or Brahman (heaven), and don’t rebirth. This “way” consists in the four noble truth and the Eight-fold Path. “ that life is sorrow; that the cause of sorrow is desire; I that escape is through the destruction of desire; that this destruction is to be achieved by the eight-fold path, of which the steps.are:1) right belief, 2) right resolve, 3) right speech, 4) right behavior, 5) right occupation, 6) right effort,. 7) right contemplation, 8) right concentration.”(page 1).

    We uses these to find, how conquered our “self” so we could do a better version of us and go to Nirvana faster. “One should do what one teaches others to do; if one would train others, one should be well−controlled oneself. Difficult, indeed is self−control.” (page 3). I think that this sentence is really good to explain how to conquered ourselves; to do it we have to do that things that we wanted that other people do to us and that we train to teach them.

    “Lead a life of good conduct. Lead not a base life. The righteous live happily both in this world and the next. One who looks upon the world as a bubble and a mirage, that person the King of Death does not see.” (Page 4). Also this sentence is important, because it explain that you should do good things in your life to go to Nirvana and you can’t only be there waiting to your moment.

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    1. Reply to Jamie:

      There was a mixup in class which Mr. L’Hereux clarified. In Buddhism there is little to no explanation as to what happens when one reaches the state of Nirvana besides the escape of the cycle of rebirth, Samsara. Brahman and Heaven are more terms coined in the Hinduism and Christianity faiths. Theoretically you could say that they are the equivalent just different viewpoints from other religious views. Therefore, you could use them as a connection but I believe there should be a little more clarification so they are not to be confused with Buddhist beliefs.

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    2. Yes, sorry about that. When I write that I was trying to find a connection from the different religions and I thought that people that never hear about Nirvana or Buddhism could understand it better if they compared it with the heaven or Brahman. Also I think that there is a explanation for Nirvana, when we escape from the cycle off rebirth, similar to the Brahman, we come back to the prime energy of the world and become one with everything, that is the reason why monks meditate, to try to be one with that energy.

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    3. While in Buddhism they believe in a faster way to freedom from samsara. I don’t think it’s easy. There is no easy way to renounce self and free yourself from rebirth. I takes a true master to follow the eight fold path and the four noble truths.

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  2. In the Buddhist belief all suffering comes from desire. The Buddha mastered self and eliminated his desire and want. He found that the body is weak and impermanent but the self is true and everlasting. “Fully worn out is this body, a nest of disease, and fragile. This foul mass breaks up, for death is the end of life.“(1). In order to master what is important which is self and in turn desire you must follow the 8 fold path of righteousness having all you do be right. “One should first establish oneself in what is proper; then only should one instruct others.” (3) then once mastering this path you can follow a truly righteous path of freeing others from desire and suffering by teaching what you have achieved. The Buddha found himself a truly holy individual when he freed himself and realized the only holy people are those who mastered self and eliminated desire “One who holds aloof from householders and ascetics alike, and wanders about with no fixed abode and but few wants−−such a one do I call a holy person.“(16) He followed a middle path one with no desire but also without everything.

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    1. Reply to Henry:

      What is the term for someone who has mastered the truly righteous path and frees others of desire through their teachings? What exactly do you mean “without everything” in your quote: “He followed a middle path one with no desire but also without everything.”?

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    2. Reply to Henry:
      I think that one of the most important points of your explanation is the self and work in it, but in my opinion you should also explain that the Buddhism teach people to forget about the you and start to think more in “ the everything” and less in the individual.

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    3. Mikayla the term for someone who helps free others with their teaching is a bodhisattva. It is one who has achieved nirvana but hangs back inirder to free others. And one with no desire but without everyone is one who has enough to sustain himself therefore without desire but also doesn’t have an exces of things therefore without everyone. As the Buddha discovered one must follow a middle path.

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  3. People must conquer their “self” through The Eightfold Path [Right understanding (Sammā ditthi,) Right intention (Sammā sankappa,) Right Speech (Sammā sankappa,) Right action (Sammā kammanta,) Right livelihood (Sammā ājiva,) Right effort (Sammā vāyāma,) Right mindfulness (Sammā sati,) and Right concentration (Sammā samādhi.)] and The Four Noble Truths [Suffering (Dukkha,) Origin of suffering (Samudāya,) Cessation of suffering (Nirodha,) Path to the Cessation of Suffering (Magga.)]

    “The body is a city built of bones, plastered with flesh and blood, containing within decay and death, pride and jealousy.” (DP, 2)

    According to the Buddha the origin of suffering is desire (tanhā) which comes in three forms: greed/desire (Rooster,) ignorance/delusion (Pig,) and hatred/destructive urges (snake.) To transcend the cycle of suffering one must not feel desire or attachment, which leads to pain.

    “Repeated birth is indeed suffering! (...) You will not build this house again. (...) My mind has reached the Unconditioned: I have attained the destruction of craving.” (DP 2)

    Humans are repeatedly put through Samsara (the painful cycle of rebirth) until they have reached Nirvana, and after that, Buddha doesn’t specify what happens to oneself.

    “(...) man’s subjection to endless transmigration (...) unless he can free himself by the exercise of the discipline that leads to the bliss of Nirvana.” (DP,1)

    Humans and their actions are the cause of suffering therefore we must conquer ourselves to reach Nirvana.

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    1. Reply to Mikayla:

      I like your explanation, but Buddha describe in more than one occasion that Nirvana is a state of peaceful and with out suffering,desire and karma. Also I think Buddha speak about it like a energy that connect with everything and that is in all the things. And how he say “Nirvana is supreme”.

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    2. I like the quote about not rebuilding this house. It really embodies the conquering of self, and as it says craving. In conquering self he has reached nirvana and freed himself from samsara.

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